Authors

Misumi Kubo

Misumi Kubo 窪美澄

Misumi Kubo (1965–)  withdrew from junior college and worked for an ad company before turning freelance as a writer and editor, focusing on such topics as pregnancy and childbirth, women’s health, herbal medicine, and divination. In 2009, her short story Mikumari (from the name of a shrine that appears in the story) won the Women’s R-18 Literary Award, a new-writer prize for erotic fiction penned “by women for women.” The following year this became the first of five linked stories in Fugainai boku wa sora o mita (Feckless Me with Eyes to the Sky), her first published book, which received the 2011 Yamamoto Shūgorō Prize, placed second in the Booksellers Award balloting that year, and became a runaway bestseller. She went on to win the Yamada Fūtarō Prize in 2012 with Seiten no mayoi kujira (Stray Whale on a Sunny Day). Her other works include Kuraudo kurasutā o aisuru hōhō (How to Love a Cloud Cluster), Anibāsarī (Anniversary), Ame no namae (The Name of the Rain), and Sayonara niruvāna (Goodbye Nirvana).

Books by Misumi Kubo
  • Book

    Feckless Me with Eyes to the Sky

    These five linked stories center on a single mother, who runs a small maternity hospital, and her 15-year-old son Takumi. Each story is told by a different narrator: the first by Takumi himself; the second by his older, married sex-friend, Satomi; the thi …

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    Night Emergence

    This collection of linked stories, set in a shopping district of the old shitamachi merchant and artisan quarter of Tokyo, tells of a complicated love triangle between two brothers and the woman they have both been in love with from an early age. The thr …

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    Goodbye Nirvana

    A controversial novel based loosely on a series of child assaults and murders that took place in Kōbe in 1997. The real-world events on which this work is based involved attacks on five grade-school children?four girls and one boy?over the course of sev …

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    The Red Letter Project

    This provocative novel looks into the near future of Japan, boldly imagining how society might change if the country’s declining births, rising percentage of people who do not marry, and growing number of “herbivore men” (so named for their relative …

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