Tomoyuki Hoshino

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Tomoyuki Hoshino

Tomoyuki Hoshino 星野智幸

Tomoyuki Hoshino (1965–)  was born in Los Angeles but moved to Japan when he was two. After university, he worked as a journalist at one of Japan’s major newspapers, then went to Mexico for further study and fell in love with soccer and Latin America. He made his debut as a writer in 1998 when the novella Saigo no toiki (Last Gasp) won the Bungei Prize. In 2000 he established his reputation as a serious literary writer with the novel Mezameyo to ningyo wa utau (“Wake Up,” Sings the Mermaid), which won the Mishima Yukio Prize. Fantajisuta (Fantasista) was awarded the Noma Prize for New Writers in 2003. Ore ore (It’s Me, It’s Me), an unsettling story about a young man who suffers an identity crisis after getting tangled up in a telephone scam, won the Kenzaburō Ōe Prize in 2011; and his Yoru wa owaranai (The Night Never Ends) took the Yomiuri Prize for Literature (Fiction) in 2015. Hoshino employs a highly original style to toy with and subvert unconventional scenarios. His other works include the novels Ronrī hātsu kirā (Lonely Hearts Killer) and Niji to Kuroe no monogatari (The Tale of Chloë and the Rainbow); and the story collection Warera neko no ko (We the Children of Cats, tr. 2012).
http://hoshinot.asablo.jp/blog/
pmpress.org/content/article.php?story=Hoshino

Books by Tomoyuki Hoshino
  • Book

    Fantasista

    In this collection of three novellas, the title story is set in Japan the day before the 2005 general election. Nagata, a politician who started out as a soccer player and is now chairman of the popular Urawa Reds team, has given up his post as governor o …

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  • Book

    “Wake Up,” Sings the Mermaid

    This is Hoshino's first full-length work of fiction. It is set in a grand log cabin with a red roof in the hinterland of the Izu Peninsula, more than 20 minutes' walk from the local railway station. The area where the house stands was due to be developed …

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  • Book

    It’s Me, It’s Me

    This novel centers on the "It's me" telephone scam, targeting especially the elderly, that has escalated in Japan since the year 2000. In a typical case the caller identifies himself only by saying "Hey, it's me," and goes on to claim in gr …

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  • Book

    The Spell

    This novel portraying the growing economic inequalities that divide Japanese society into winners and losers?with the latter venting their frustrations by lashing out at one another?offers a twisted, near-future projection of where the country may be head …

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