PK
Author: Kōtaro Isaka
Specifications: ISBN  978-4062174961
215 pages
14.0 x 19.4 cm / 5.6 x 7.8 in (WxH)
Category: Fiction
Publisher: Kodansha Ltd.
Tokyo, 2012
www.kodansha.co.jp
Agents: Cork, Inc.
Buy now: amazon.co.jp

Synopsis

This volume contains three medium-length works set in a Japan of the near future. Loosely linked in their subject matter and themes, they are regarded collectively as the author’s "futurist trilogy."

In the title work, "PK" is a reference both to "psychokinesis" and to a "penalty kick" in the game of soccer. A decade ago, when Team Japan met Team Iraq in the World Cup regional finals, Japan emerged victorious after ace striker Ozu made good on an extra-time penalty kick. As he was getting ready for the kick, his teammate and childhood friend Uno said something to him. Over the years since, the current minister of state has wondered what exactly might have been said in the exchange between the two players, and now he asks his secretary to investigate. The secretary finds it curious that the minister should suddenly take such a strong interest in the exchange at a time when the secretary-general of his party is pressuring him to give false testimony. A childhood friend of the secretary, now an author, notes suggestively that sometimes a series of insignificant shifts have a cumulative or chain effect that leads to a much greater change . . .

Chojin (Superhuman) is the second story. Honda, a young sales rep for a security company, appears at the home of author Mishima. Saying he is a big fan of Mishima’s writing, Honda makes a confession to him. He claims to have the ability to foresee the future, and as evidence, describes how he periodically receives text messages that tell him the name and address of a person who will commit a crime, and the date on which it will happen. Since becoming aware of this phenomenon, he has taken it upon himself to kill the future perpetrator before he can do any harm. Even while Honda is at Mishima’s house, another such text message arrives. The date given is ten years hence, the number of victims will be 10,000, and the perpetrator named is the current minister of state (the same man who appears in "PK"). Twenty-seven years earlier, the minister saved the three-year-old Honda’s life by catching him when he accidentally fell from a fourth-floor apartment balcony. Honda garners a dinner appointment with the minister, and then . . .

In the final tale, Misshi (Secret Agent), college student Mikami realizes he has a special power. On any given day, he can steal six seconds of time from each person with whom he shakes hands. Just before midnight, time stands still for the rest of the world, while Mikami has this stolen time all to himself to enjoy as he pleases?six seconds times the number of people he shook hands with that day. In order to maximize the number of people he shakes hands with, Mikami decides to work as a costumed hero on a popular children’s television show. As he gradually increases the amount of time he has to himself, he begins hearing whispers. "I know about your power." "I need your power." He also receives letters and text messages asking for his help. When told that he can save the world if he will do "one simple job," he accepts, and then . . .

Contact: Ryosuke Saegusa (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), Cork Inc.