The Amazing Power of Cleaning Up: Nine Deep Secrets

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The Amazing Power of Cleaning Up: Nine Deep Secrets
Author: Kouei Hazuki
Specifications: ISBN  978-4309284774
229 pages
13.0 x 18.6 cm / 5.2 x 7.4 in (WxH)
Category: Crafts, Hobbies & Home
Publisher: Kawade Shobo Shinsha, Publishers
Tokyo, 2014
www.kawade.co.jp
Buy now: amazon.co.jp

Synopsis

A numerologist presents a system for tidying up and organizing that begins with an analysis of your psychological disposition, then brings principles of numerology to bear in showing how to create living spaces that will enhance your daily life.

The persistent clutter in your home is rooted in your own individual psychology, says author Kouei Hazuki. You bring it on yourself, and there is a reason for it. In one way or another, the spots crying out for attention manifest your personal interests and talents. Whether it be books or clothing, kitchen implements or other household items, having too much of something to keep it all in order implies a special attachment on the part of the owner. Yet, in spite of holding sufficient interest for the owner to accumulate large quantities of these things, their cluttered state typically indicates that he’s not making the most of them in his life. This happens because he doesn’t realize the hidden talent they embody. Once he identifies that talent and begins exercising it, the clutter will disappear. As an example, Hazuki notes that he used to live surrounded by countless teetering piles of books, but that his compulsion to acquire ever more books subsided once he became an author himself. His affinity for the written word was satisfied by his authoring activities, and he no longer needed book ownership as a substitute.

The essential first step is to analyze the locations and kinds of clutter in your home to suss out the personal affinities or aspirations that are driving it. How you move forward from there depends on what you discover in this process. Tidying up requires you to come to terms with the desires and attachments of your past, but also enables you to adopt a new, more forward-looking frame of mind regarding the things you keep in your life.

Ultimately, a genuine desire to change is more important to achieving a neat and tidy living space than any particular organizational technique. For best results, that desire should be directed toward one or more of three key elements: how you manage your time, who you interact with, and where you live.

Hazuki goes on to recommend his own unique system of organization rooted in numerology. Based on properties associated with the digits 1 through 9, he assigns a digit to each part of the home?the front entrance foyer, the hallway and stairs, children’s rooms, kitchen, den, etc. He then analyzes the psychological inclinations or states of mind that might cause clutter to accumulate in each location, offers tips for tidying each place up along with special mantras to foster auspicious results, and discusses the benefits that can be expected.

By casting light on the latent potential that resides in clutter, Hazuki inspires readers to tackle the disorder in their homes head on. It is a must-read book for those inclined to let themselves off the hook by saying clutter just can’t be helped.